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  • Bayhealth recognized for quality cardiac care

  • Bayhealth's Kent General Hospital and Milford Memorial Hospital recently received the Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing improvements and prevention guidelines for heart failure patients.
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  • Bayhealth’s Kent General Hospital and Milford Memorial Hospital recently received the Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing improvements and prevention guidelines for heart failure patients.
    The Award was based on the hospitals’ implementation of improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology Foundation guidelines for heart failure patients. The program helps hospital teams provide the most current, research-based guidelines for speedy recovery and reduction of hospital readmissions.
    This award marks the fifth year Bayhealth has been recognized with a quality achievement award. Bayhealth earned the recognitions by meeting achievement measurements for the diagnosis and treatment of heart failure patients, including proper use of medications and aggressive risk-reduction therapies like cholesterol-reducing drugs, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, aspirin, diuretics and anticoagulants while patients were admitted in the hospital. Before discharge, patients also receive education on managing their heart failure and overall health, as well as cardiac rehabilitation referrals.
    “We are pleased to recognize Bayhealth for their commitment to heart failure care,” said Deepak L. Bhatt, national chairman of the Get With The Guidelines steering committee and executive director of Interventional Cardiovascular Programs at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Studies have shown that hospitals that consistently follow Get With The Guidelines quality improvement measures can reduce patients’ length of stays and 30-day readmission rates and also reduce disparity gaps in care.”
    According to the American Heart Association, about 5.1 million people suffer from heart failure.  Each year, 670,000 new cases are diagnosed and more than 275,000 people die of heart failure. However, many heart failure patients can lead a full life when their condition is managed with proper medications and devices and with healthy lifestyle changes.
    For more information about the program, visit heart.org/quality or heart.org/myhealthcare.

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