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Dover Post
  • Recipes that will help you pinch pennies morning, noon and night

  • It seems that when bills start to pile up and times get tight food is one of the first areas where people have to compromise. You can’t exactly choose how much your cable bill is, but you can decide if you eat roast beef or ramen. I wanted to share a few recipes that can help you pinch pennies, while still offering a fa...
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  • It seems that when bills start to pile up and times get tight food is one of the first areas where people have to compromise. You can’t exactly choose how much your cable bill is, but you can decide if you eat roast beef or ramen. I wanted to share a few recipes that can help you pinch pennies, while still offering a fair amount of nutritional value. In my eyes, the key to this balance is buying inexpensive but wholesome ingredients and making meals from scratch, rather than relying on convenience items, which are expensive.
    Breakfast is said to be the most important meal of the day, but when it comes time to pinch pennies, it’s easy to justify skipping the day’s first meal. Luckily, my chunky monkey baked oatmeal is inexpensive, delicious and healthy. The bananas give you a dose of fruit, the peanut butter provides protein and the oats give you some whole grain nutrition. It also helps that oats stick to your ribs and will have you feeling full all the way until lunch.
    I brown bag my lunch every day and I have three sandwiches that I eat on a rotating basis because they’re so affordable. They are peanut butter and jelly, tuna fish and egg salad. Eggs are a great inexpensive protein source. A carton of eggs is roughly $1.50 – $2.50 if you’re buying organic. Considering that you get 12 eggs in a carton, that’s a pretty good deal. I would estimate that I can make a batch of egg salad for $2 or less, meaning the six sandwiches I get out of that batch will cost right around 40 cents each, including bread and raw spinach for topping.
    Rice has to be a staple for anyone that is looking to tighten their purse strings. When a lot of people think of inexpensive food, they think of ramen noodles but, in reality, one serving of rice is vastly cheaper than one serving of ramen. Dried beans are another inexpensive staple and lentils are my favorite dried bean because they cook up in a snap. I combine lentils, rice and some veggies for a well-balanced, inexpensive meal. A good dose of cumin provides a smoky flavor. Brown rice is technically the healthier option, but for this dish I prefer the texture of white rice.
    I hope these recipes keep you full and happy during breakfast, lunch and dinner, without breaking the bank.
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