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  • Dr. Villar releases tips for safe antibiotic use

  • Bryan Villar, MD, of Bayhealth Family Practice of Georgetown, explains some of the most common mis-beliefs about antibiotics and children.
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  • Bryan Villar, MD, of Bayhealth Family Practice of Georgetown, explains some of the most common mis-beliefs about antibiotics and children.
    A virus is a sickness that cannot be cured by antibiotics:
    Most of the time when we see pediatric patients with cold or flu symptoms, they have a virus, not a bacterial infection. Parents can help their child feel better by offering fluids like water and juice, and by using Tylenol, Motrin, or Advil to keep fevers down.
    Most colds and flus are viruses. Chest congestion and sinus congestion are usually caused by viruses.
    Antibiotics will not help your child get well faster:
    Viruses run for three to five days, typically. The only thing we can do for a virus is make children comfortable and let them rest. 
    If your child has symptoms that last for several days, s/he may have a bacterial infection. This can happen when the immune system is weakened from a virus. Please call your health provider. 
    Physicians cannot prescribe antibiotics over the phone:
    It’s important for me and for all doctors to see patients in person. Every child is different. I need to see your child so I can make the best recommendation for treatment. 
    If you are worried about your child, make an appointment. Don’t wait until the weekend.
    Antibiotics can cause problems if they are prescribed when they are not needed:
    If your child takes antibiotics often, s/he can become resistant to them. If s/he has a more serious illness later on, it may be difficult for your provider to find the appropriate medicine to give. The best medication for your child’s illness may not work because s/he has built up a resistance to it. 
    Strong antibiotics can cause side effects. Your child may have nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.
    If you are worried about your sick child, call your primary care provider:
    Parents often check online for health advice. They may read blogs written by people without medical training. Your child’s primary care provider is the best person to talk to when you are concerned about your child’s health. 
    For more information: bayhealth.org.
     

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