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Dover Post
  • Spring has sprung, and it's yard sale time

  • Thinking abut having a yard or garage sale? It can be fun and profitable, but you need to do some planning, too.
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    • Some rules and regulations on yard sales

      Thinking of holding a yard sale?


      It’s generally no problem, but some localities have rules and regulations that should be followed before setting up a sale.


      In Kent Cou...

      » Read more
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      Some rules and regulations on yard sales

      Thinking of holding a yard sale?



      It’s generally no problem, but some localities have rules and regulations that should be followed before setting up a sale.



      In Kent County, permits are not required provided the yard or garage sale is conducted by the property owner or the residential tenant, said County Administrator Michael Petit de Mange.



      Yard and garage sales must be conducted on the residential property and are limited to the sale of household and/or consumer goods.



      County regulations limit sales to no more than two consecutive days per sale event, Petit de Mange said.



      Yard and garage sales are limited to a maximum of eight days per property per calendar year.



      Permits for garage or yard sales are not required within the city of Dover, said City Clerk Traci McDowell, or within the town of Camden, said Town Clerk Jamie Fenske.



      Permits also are not required in the town of Wyoming, said mayor Dale Rife, although the town holds an annual town-wide yard sale during the last Saturday in September in conjunction with the town of Camden.



      This year marks the inauguration of a town website that will list everyone taking part in the annual sale, Rife said.



      The town will prepare advertising banners as well, she added.



      "I hope to get a lot of residents involved," Rife said.


  • Kent County residents have been cleaning out their garages, attics and basements over the winter, and soon signs advertising yard sales and garage sales will be popping up all over.
    While these sales can be fun and profitable, advance planning can make the difference between a successful event and the need to make a trip to the Sandtown landfill afterward.
    Here are some tips to help you get ready:
    - Inventory your items – Gather your items early, weeks or even months before the sale. Group like items together and make a list along with the asking price. Use bright-colored stickers to mark the price, but hold on to your inventory list in case the stickers get lost. Set up your sale so that everything is on display and you’re ready to start at your advertised starting time.
    - Consider joint sales – Perhaps your neighbors and friends are looking to get rid of extra items, so check with them. More stuff brings in more customers and also means additional help in running the sale. Consider having more than one yard sale over the summer.
    - Research your asking prices − People are looking for deals, and they’ll quickly pass on what’s overpriced. Do the research, particularly when looking to sell antiques or items that still are new. Shoppers will not pay retail for new items, even if they’ve never been taken out of the box.
    - Choose the date well – Fridays and Saturdays are usually best days; be aware of holidays or other events like NASCAR races concerts that give potential shoppers an excuse to be elsewhere. Try to schedule around local paydays, if possible, when people have more disposable income. Check weather forecasts, but be prepared with tarps and other ways to cover your merchandise in case of rain.
    - Box together books, records, CDs – Price your hardback books the same; this also applies to paperbacks, CDs, vinyl records, etc. Group them together in a box with the price clearly labeled to make it easier for the customer to sort through them. You’ll also know the price for each in advance and won’t have to worry about lost price stickers.
    - Have a “free” box – That’s where you put broken items or things missing parts; it’s also good for getting rid of mate-less shoes, book sets missing a book, and so on.
    - Advertise – Local newspapers charge minimal fees to advertise yard sales. Be sure to post ads in local stores, and online using venues such as Craigslist. Additionally, post uniform, easy to read signs on roadways leading to your sale, but check local ordinances/HOAs about where those signs may be placed. When the sale is over, dispose of the signs right away.
    Page 2 of 4 - - Have plenty of cash on hand – Many times you’ll be paid with $20 bills; be sure to have enough coinage and small bills to make change for your customers, and organize the money so it’s easy to get to. Do not leave a cash box in the open as it’s an invitation for thieves; the best idea is to keep your money in a fanny pack. Decide in advance if you’ll take checks and look into attachments to your cell phones that will allow customers to use debit or charge cards.
    - Attractiveness sells – Passersby may not stop if your sale looks unorganized or your home or yard looks cluttered. Have plenty of plastic or paper bags handy for shoppers to carry their selections in, and put some items at the end of your driveway to draw in shoppers. Tools or law- machinery will help attract reluctant male shoppers.
    - Cleanliness sells as well – Wash clothing and fold it neatly or hang on racks using hangers. Appliances and other items also should be wiped down; rusty, oily or cobweb-covered tools don’t sell well.
    - Check the pockets – You don’t want to sell a pair of jeans for $1 that has a lost $20 bill in the pocket.
    - Corral your animals – Dogs may be man’s best friend, but they have no need to be in an environment where lots of strangers will be around. Keep them out of sight and ensure the yard has been cleared of droppings.
    - Work the customers – Don’t sit around, waiting for customers to come to you. Greet the shoppers, be helpful, and be ready to answer questions.
    - Get help – If you have a lot of customers, things can get out of hand; have some help available to manage the sale and to contribute to a safe environment.
    - Don’t be afraid to haggle­ – You’ve listed your prices, but many people still want to negotiate. Be flexible; you’re trying to get rid of the stuff you’ve got on sale. Last minute deals on leftover items near your closing time really can help move things along.
    Spring has sprung, and it’s yard sale time
    By Jeff Brown
    jeff.brown@doverpost.com
    @DoPoJeff
    Kent County residents have been cleaning out their garages, attics and basements over the winter, and soon signs advertising yard sales and garage sales will be popping up all over.
    While these sales can be fun and profitable, advance planning can make the difference between a successful event and the need to make a trip to the Sandtown landfill afterward.
    Page 3 of 4 - Here are some tips to help you get ready:
    n Inventory your items – Gather your items early, weeks or even months before the sale. Group like items together and make a list along with the asking price. Use bright-colored stickers to mark the price, but hold on to your inventory list in case the stickers get lost. Set up your sale so that everything is on display and you’re ready to start at your advertised starting time.
    n Consider joint sales – Perhaps your neighbors and friends are looking to get rid of extra items, so check with them. More stuff brings in more customers and also means additional help in running the sale. Consider having more than one yard sale over the summer.
    n Research your asking prices − People are looking for deals, and they’ll quickly pass on what’s overpriced. Do the research, particularly when looking to sell antiques or items that still are new. Shoppers will not pay retail for new items, even if they’ve never been taken out of the box.
    n Choose the date well – Fridays and Saturdays are usually best days; be aware of holidays or other events like NASCAR races concerts that give potential shoppers an excuse to be elsewhere. Try to schedule around local paydays, if possible, when people have more disposable income. Check weather forecasts, but be prepared with tarps and other ways to cover your merchandise in case of rain.
    n Box together books, records, CDs – Price your hardback books the same; this also applies to paperbacks, CDs, vinyl records, etc. Group them together in a box with the price clearly labeled to make it easier for the customer to sort through them. You’ll also know the price for each in advance and won’t have to worry about lost price stickers.
    n Have a “free” box – That’s where you put broken items or things missing parts; it’s also good for getting rid of mate-less shoes, book sets missing a book, and so on.
    n Advertise – Local newspapers charge minimal fees to advertise yard sales. Be sure to post ads in local stores, and online using venues such as Craigslist. Additionally, post uniform, easy to read signs on roadways leading to your sale, but check local ordinances/HOAs about where those signs may be placed. When the sale is over, dispose of the signs right away.
    n Have plenty of cash on hand – Many times you’ll be paid with $20 bills; be sure to have enough coinage and small bills to make change for your customers, and organize the money so it’s easy to get to. Do not leave a cash box in the open as it’s an invitation for thieves; the best idea is to keep your money in a fanny pack. Decide in advance if you’ll take checks and look into attachments to your cell phones that will allow customers to use debit or charge cards.
    Page 4 of 4 - n Attractiveness sells – Passersby may not stop if your sale looks unorganized or your home or yard looks cluttered. Have plenty of plastic or paper bags handy for shoppers to carry their selections in, and put some items at the end of your driveway to draw in shoppers. Tools or lawn machinery will help attract reluctant male shoppers.
    n Cleanliness sells as well – Wash clothing and fold it neatly or hang on racks using hangers. Appliances and other items also should be wiped down; rusty, oily or cobweb-covered tools don’t sell well.
    n Check the pockets – You don’t want to sell a pair of jeans for $1 that has a lost $20 bill in the pocket.
    n Corral your animals – Dogs may be man’s best friend, but they have no need to be in an environment where lots of strangers will be around. Keep them out of sight and ensure the yard has been cleared of droppings.
    n Work the customers – Don’t sit around, waiting for customers to come to you. Greet the shoppers, be helpful, and be ready to answer questions.
    n Get help – If you have a lot of customers, things can get out of hand; have some help available to manage the sale and to contribute to a safe environment.
    n Don’t be afraid to haggle­ – You’ve listed your prices, but many people still want to negotiate. Be flexible; you’re trying to get rid of the stuff you’ve got on sale. Last minute deals on leftover items near your closing time really can help move things along.
    Tips in this article were compiled from numerous sources including wikihow.com, moneysavingsmom.com, yardsalequeen.com and the author's own experiences.
     

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