The U.S. Constitution requires supermajority votes in the Senate only in very limited circumstances — mainly to approve treaties and override presidential vetoes.


The Founding Fathers had no intention that a supermajority would be required for Senate approval of ordinary legislation or confirmation of presidential appointees. There’s nothing in the Constitution about Senate filibusters.


But we have reached the point in recent years where almost nothing gets approved without the votes of 60 senators — especially in light of the Senate minority leader’s solemn vow to block anything and everything supported by President Obama.


Which bring us to THIS SITUATION...

Read more

The U.S. Constitution requires supermajority votes in the Senate only in very limited circumstances — mainly to approve treaties and override presidential vetoes.

The Founding Fathers had no intention that a supermajority would be required for Senate approval of ordinary legislation or confirmation of presidential appointees. There’s nothing in the Constitution about Senate filibusters.

But we have reached the point in recent years where almost nothing gets approved without the votes of 60 senators — especially in light of the Senate minority leader’s solemn vow to block anything and everything supported by President Obama.

Which bring us to THIS SITUATION...

Read more