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Dover Post
  • Dover Air Force Base demolition training disturbs Kent County residents

  • The loud explosions that disturbed Kent County residents from as far away as the Delaware-Maryland border Saturday turned out to be a monthly training exercise with explosives conducted by the Dover Air Force Base's 512th Airlift Wing.
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  • The loud explosions that disturbed Kent County residents from as far away as the Delaware-Maryland border Saturday turned out to be a monthly training exercise with explosives conducted by the Dover Air Force Base's 512th Airlift Wing.
    The reserve wing of the Dover Air Force Base was holding its monthly demolition training, said 2nd Lt. Remoshay Nelson, public affairs manager for the 436th Airlift Wing, the active U.S. Air Force segment of the Dover base.
    Several calls were made to the Kent County 911 Center because of the explosions that caused several homes to shake, Delaware Emergency Management Agency officials said. That prompted DEMA to announce on its Facebook page that the Dover Air Force Base had been working with explosives on its range for several hours.
    512th Airlift Wing spokeswoman Master Sgt. Veronica Aceveda said that the overcast weather that Dover had experienced lately may have intensified the sound of the ordnance explosions. Namely, low cloud cover was known to intensify the sound of ordnance disposal, she said
    "That's possibly the reason more people heard it," Aceveda said.
    Some residents complained that Dover Air Force Base had not notified residents of the ordnance training beforehand. But others defended DAFB as a "mission essential" base that had to keep its military personnel highly trained during the "war on terrorism."
    Aceveda said she would research at what point the Dover Air Force Base would determine the need to notify people of upcoming training.

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