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Dover Post
  • Republicans vie for authenticity in 32nd District primary as Democratic incumbent steps aside

  • Retired Judge Ellis Parrott believes he gives voters an authentic Republican in the GOP primary for the 32nd District of the Delaware House of Representatives race while Libertarian-turned-Republican Will McVay believes the GOP and the state as a whole need a new voice.


     


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  • Retired Judge Ellis Parrott believes he gives voters an authentic Republican in the GOP primary for the 32nd District of the Delaware House of Representatives race while Libertarian-turned-Republican Will McVay believes the GOP and the state as a whole need a new voice.
    Parrott said his core beliefs were Republican after membership in the GOP for more than 40 years.
    “My opponent is vice-chair of the Libertarian Party of Delaware and only registered as a Republican in late May of this year just before filing as a candidate for the 32nd District,” Parrott said. “He is a Libertarian at heart and not a Republican and does not have the State Republican Party nor its members in mind.”
    McVay said he could offer “a new vitality and openness to the Republican Party and actually achieve the goals it purports to have set.
    “I am not beholden to the same fundraisers and political organizations your typical Republican politician will be,” McVay said. “I will engage in an open and public discussion with anyone, including my opponent, and explain my perspective and my beliefs.”
    The 32nd District seat is being vacated by State Rep. Bradley Bennett (D-Dover), who decided to retire after his second DUI arrest in April and battle with alcoholism. His wife, Andria, and Dr. William McGlumphy, will face each other in the Democratic Primary for this seat.
    Parrott and McVay had different views on whether the Republicans could capitalize on the Democratic incumbent’s departure.
    Parrott said it would make no difference.
    “The voters will vote on the person they feel will do the best job representing them and not on what has occurred in the past involving someone who is no longer a consideration,” he said.
    McVay, meanwhile, said an open seat was both a blessing and a curse.
    “An open seat doesn't have an incumbent who has gotten name recognition by … putting his name on a bill, but it also doesn't have an incumbent with a record of bad legislation,” McVay said. “The district is still overwhelmingly Democratic and Independent.  Any Republican will have to offer general election voters something besides what they're used to getting.”
    Page 2 of 2 - As for the most important issues facing the 32nd District and the state, Parrott focused on jobs and education reform.
    “Unless we make the atmosphere more conducive to small businesses by lowering the gross receipts tax, we will never have the tax base that will support the important programs the state needs to implement to aid those who need temporary assistance,” he said. “[And] parents should have more control of where their tax money goes in educating their children.”
    McVay said the main issue facing the state was openness and trust in government and how that in turn related to keeping jobs and enhancing the educational system.
    “When you have legislation that is introduced and passed in nine days with the support of most of the legislators from both major parties that creates a massive tax and regulatory loophole for a politically well connected company, like you did with Senate Bill 124 [a renewable energy bill], you're going to see a stagnant economy.”
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