The Capital School District is looking to remedy a situation whereby students who have demonstrated the ability to take an Advanced Placement course in at least one subject are somehow missing from those classes.


The Capital School District is looking to remedy a situation whereby students who have demonstrated the ability to take an Advanced Placement course in at least one subject are somehow missing from those classes.

That was one of the tidbits of information shared by Capital Race to the Top Coordinator Lawanda Burgoyne in a Race to the Top update prepared for the Capital Board of Education Wednesday night. The school board held its regular meeting at North Dover Elementary School.

An organization called Equal Opportunity Schools is dedicated to finding out how much black and low-income students are underrepresented in AP classes, Burgoyne said. This organization calculated that Capital has 164 students who should be in at least one AP class – based on their PSAT scores – but are not., she said.

“We need to get them in those courses with the support they need to be successful in those courses,” Burgoyne said.

Dover High School has since asked teachers to send referrals in for students with AP potential, she said. Thus far, that has resulted in 40 students who may take AP courses next year.

Assistant Superintendent Dr. Tina Huff said the “missing students” run the gamut in terms of race and socioeconomics.

Dover High is one of 10 schools in Delaware’s Partnership Zone, created as part of the state’s $119 million Race to the Top federal award. Race to the Top is President Obama’s national effort to improve schools through competitive grants using money from the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, also known as the federal stimulus package.

Partnership Zone schools must carry out one of four models to significantly improve student performance. In December, the Capital School District Board of Education approved a plan to dramatically revamp the administrative structure of Dover High School so that it would have two principals to handle administration and academics separately.

Delaware Secretary of Education Dr. Lillian M. Lowery approved Dover High School’s plan in January.