During Dover Days, Delmarva Historic Haunts is going to let the public see – or more likely hear – what happens after nightfall. The group is leading a Paranormal 101 class where students will learn what the group’s investigators do on their on-the-road team. Then, members of the public will join the group for a historic paranormal walking tour of The Green.


Once the lights go out around The Green, the action doesn’t stop. Or at least, not to those who say they’ve seen a headless woman strolling by, and men on horseback approaching the historic piece of land.

During Dover Days, Delmarva Historic Haunts is going to let the public see – or more likely hear – what happens after nightfall. The group is leading a Paranormal 101 class where students will learn what the group’s investigators do on their on-the-road team. Then, members of the public will join the group for a historic paranormal walking tour of The Green.

Rick Coherd of Milford, CEO of Delmarva Historic Haunts, filled us in on what the group is up to, and what visitors to The Green might experience.

1 The capital’s core
A few weeks from now, members of Delmarva Historic Haunts will go deep into The Green for a nighttime investigation. They’ll film it so those planning on participating during Dover Days will know what they’re in for.
Coherd is a self-described “history nut,” so investigating The Green is a thrill.
“Everything that happened in Delaware in our past happened on The Green,” he said.
People camped out and died on that land. They fought for the right to vote on that land. And they were sold into slavery on that land.
“Life is difficult, right? Sometimes death is, too,” he said. “It’s not cut and dry, it’s not black and white, it’s grey. And for whatever reason, whether they’re ghosts or whatever they are, they leave a trace of themselves, and not only that but they talk to you at times.”

2 What to expect
Those going on one of the Dover Days outings will be holding equipment and learning how the process works, although they won’t be actually doing the investigation. Participants will be split into three groups: One in the lab, where the DVR, cameras, and equipment is; one group on The Green to hear about the homes and surroundings; and one with tools to carry around the area.
They’ll have investigators to lead them through Paranormal 101 class, and also interpreters to make sense of what is being seen and heard.

3 Putting history in the forefront
Delmarva Historic Haunts looks into places that are 100 years or older and, unlike some paranormal groups, most of their investigators have a strong background in history. Coherd actually works full time at Fort Delaware.
“We’re about history first, [and] paranormal number two,” he said.

4 Proper language
The group uses language from the time of their investigation to get responses. For example, while looking into a Civil War-era home, they found out they might be looking for kids’ spirits. Coherd asked what game they might like to play, and heard nothing. When they checked the recordings, however, they distinctly heard the word “slipper.” They went back and played a game of Pass the Slipper, which was popular at the time, and their EVP – or Electronic Voice Phenomena – ratings was off the charts. When they left, they recorded a voice saying “bye-bye.”

5 Believers
Coherd and his crew know they’ve heard and seen things, although Coherd hesitates to label what it is.
“Did I see a ghost? No. Did I hear a ghost? I don’t know. But I heard something I can’t explain, and it’s based on historic fact.”
He said when you hear what he’s heard – such as someone whispering in his ear when he’s alone in a room – there’s no doubt that something is present.
“A lot of groups are trying to prove that there’s something out there,” he said. “I don’t have to prove it, I already know.”