Dover Police arrested a teenager for the murder of another teen about two hours after they began their murder investigation late Monday morning thanks to footage of the shooting captured by downtown security cameras.


Dover Police arrested a teenager for the murder of another teen about two hours after they began their murder investigation late Monday morning thanks to footage of the shooting captured by downtown security cameras.

Dover Police arrested Matthew Hoskins, 16, of the unit block of N. Governors Ave, for the murder of Quamere Bowden, 19, of Dover, Dover Police Lt. Benton Counselman said Tuesday morning.

Hoskins was taken into custody at his residence without incident, Counselman said. Detectives from the Criminal Investigation Unit used the downtown security cameras that captured the shooting to help with their investigation.

The victim was shot eight times by Hoskins with a small caliber firearm, Counselman said. Hoskins then fled the scene.

Hoskins was committed to Stevenson House without bond for the charge of murder in the first degree, he said. He was also charged with possession of a firearm by a person prohibited and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.

Dover Police detectives began their investigation of the fatal shooting near the junction of South New Street and West Reed Street in downtown Dover late Monday morning. Police cordoned off a one-block radius for some time as they collected evidence and sought information from neighbors and passersby regarding the apparent murder.

The Dover Police 911 Communications Center received multiple calls regarding a young man that was shot in the area of South New Street and Reed Street at 11:34 a.m. Monday,  Counselman said Monday afternoon. Police who responded to the scene arrived to find Bowden down on the ground.

Bowden had suffered multiple gunshot wounds, Counselman said. The victim was transported to Bay Health Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead a short time later, he said.

Several bystanders assembling out of sheer curiosity told police they had seen nothing.

The shooting took place near the nonprofit organization House of Pride, where several people gathered outside to observe police at work. And there are several churches within the vicinity.

Samantha Peters, who lives on South New Street, said she did not hear anything Monday morning. But when police came through her back yard with one of their canines, a German shepherd, she put her dog, a pit bull-boxer mix, inside.

It seemed to Peters that violence in her neighborhood had increased in the past year. And this latest police scene made Peters want to move from her Dover home, which she shares with her mother, one of her sons, a grandson and a young, adopted son.

“This street has been getting bad since summer time,” Peters said. “It’s been crazy for a year now. My mom wants to get back home to New Jersey.

“It’s a shame because every time you turn around there’s a shootout,” she added.

Her fellow neighbors on South New Street are good people, Peters said. She blamed people who do not live on her block for bringing trouble with them to their city block.

Across the street, neighbor Brian Hicks had just gotten home shortly after noon, returning from the new job he had just landed. He saw his street crawling with police collecting evidence. But it was no surprise to Hicks, who has lived on New Street for three years. The scene was just the latest for an area known for incidents – Reed and South New streets, he said.

“It’s not surprising,” Hicks said. “Somebody gets shot up here all the time.”

But Hicks did not feel the need to move, necessarily.

“Stuff happens. Wherever you go there’s going to be violence,” he said. “I guess there’s too many guns on the street. It’s too easy to get a gun these days. I’d like to see a stepped up police presence around here to deter some of the stuff that’s going on.”