Delaware Senate President Pro Tem Anthony DeLuca this evening provided reporters with details about how he divides his time between his work as a lawmaker and his duties as an administrator with the Delaware Department of Labor.


Delaware Senate President Pro Tem Anthony DeLuca this evening provided reporters with details about how he divides his time between his work as a lawmaker and his duties as an administrator with the Delaware Department of Labor.

The Varlano Democrat released copies of unpaid leave requests filed with his departmental supervisor dating back to January of 2010 and covering each day the Senate was in session, as well as other days where he participated in off-session legislative meetings.

Most of the documents show that on a typical Senate session day, DeLuca clocked in at his labor department job in the Carvel building in Wilmington at 7 a.m., then clocked out around noon—presumably when he left for Dover.

The rest of the afternoon spent at Legislative Hall, up until DeLuca’s scheduled eight-hour shift at the DOL ends at 3 p.m., is listed as unpaid leave.

The records appear to show that DeLuca has not been getting paid for his labor department job while he has been working on Senate business.

In 2010, DeLuca logged 252.5 hours of unpaid leave for legislative business. He’s recorded 154.5 hours through May 31 of this year.

DeLuca was not available for comment when the documents were released, said Senate Democratic caucus spokesman Patrick Jackson, who was instructed to give the leave records to reporters late Tuesday.

For the last six months, DeLuca has been the subject of press probes seeking documents substantiating his work habits at both jobs.

Requests for DeLuca’s timesheets made under the state’s Freedom of Information Act were denied on the basis of DeLuca’s status as a merit-system employee.

Reporters also wanted to see logs showing when DeLuca swiped his state-issued ID card to gain entry to the Carvel building and Legislative Hall, but the Attorney General’s office said anti-terrorism laws keep that information private.

In a press release accompanying the leave records, DeLuca unveiled legislation that would require all statewide elected officials to disclose whatever income they earn from jobs outside their state offices, as well as records showing whether or not they are docked pay when on the clock for official business.

DeLuca defended those elected officials who earn money at other jobs.

“People are saying things that are quite simply arrant nonsense that paints a grossly inaccurate and unfair picture of legislators,” DeLuca said in the release.

The pro tem also addressed his own employment situation.

“These records, I think, speak for themselves,” he said. “If members of the media are straight with their readers and listeners, they know I work very hard separating my Senate duties from my Department of Labor duties.”

DeLuca, a state senator since 1998, got his job as a labor law enforcement administrator in 2005. His legislative salary and his DOL pay equal roughly $131,000 per year, including benefits.

Last month, federal investigators cleared DeLuca of any wrongdoing after it was alleged that he violated laws prohibiting elected officials from overseeing programs involving federal funds, in this case money given to the Department of Labor under a contract with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.