In order to fully look into Dover’s pay for performance evaluation system, city council voted to evaluate the approximately 80 non-bargaining city positions and see they are being paid correctly for their job title at the May 27 meeting.


    In order to fully look into Dover’s pay for performance evaluation system, city council voted to evaluate the approximately 80 non-bargaining city positions and see they are being paid correctly for their job title at the May 27 meeting.

    The pay for performance system allows city employees to be rated for job performance, with those ratings used to determine possible salary adjustments.

    The Management Advisory Group, an outside consulting group, already had been contracted by the city to conduct a review of the system to see if it was being implemented correctly, but now with an additional $5,000, that work will be expanded with tasks such as conducting a market study that compares similar jobs in similarly sized cities. The extra funds were found in the current budget, said City Manager Tony DePrima.

    The contract states that the total cost of the entire review will not exceed $39,965.

    The additional evaluation work passed council on a vote of 8-1 with Councilman William McGlumphy offering strong objections.

    The Second District councilman felt changing the contract was “ludicrous” because part of the new work already was covered in the original contract. McGlumphy also said if council had been aware the scope of the work was going to be expanded, this consulting group wouldn’t have been chosen.

    McGlumphy has continually expressed his opposition to pay accelerations over the past five years that he feels have been too great. Even if he doesn’t support the market study, he said he did support the group coming in to determine if the pay for performance has become too expensive for the citizens of Dover.

    In response to McGlumphy’s objections, Councilman Reuben Salters pointed out regardless of what the market study finds, council still has the authority to accept or reject those recommendations.

    “I think we should think about that and realize that’s our ultimate weapon,” he said.

    Councilman Thomas Leary said he also has grave concerns about the entire pay for performance system, but he was voting to increase the scope of the study because he thought it was the fair thing to do.

In other business...
    • Council voted 6-3 to rezone approximately 14 acres of a west Dover industrial park to residential housing. The rezoning of Enterprise Business Park on North Street allows the existing Woodmill Apartments to expand.

    The vote went in favor of the rezoning in spite of objections from the Central Delaware Economic Development Council, the city’s planning staff and the Preliminary Land Use Service or PLUS, which is a state agency review of major land use changes.

    The dissenting votes came from McGlumphy, Councilwoman Beverly Williams and Councilman Eugene Ruane. McGlumphy felt the change was counter to economic development, while Williams said she was inclined to follow the PLUS review’s recommendation. Ruane said he knows it’s difficult to find industrially zoned land that already has the infrastructure in place to support it.

    • With a 7-2 vote, council agreed to allow city officials and the mayor to speak publicly against Senate Bill 245, which is currently assigned to a legislative committee. The bill deals with limiting the use of eminent domain solely for public use and specifically not for economic development.

    DePrima said he has concerns about how the bill seems to cast a wider net than just economic development.